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Looking good!  :thumb:

If your brakes still feel a tad spongy you can tie the lever back to the grip overnight. I use a zip-tie and don't make it too tight - just enough to hold the lever back.  Any extra air in the system will work its way up into the master cylinder.

Carrying tools is a good thing. I have all kinds of tools stuffed under the seat of my street bike and more in the tank bag including a tire patch kit and a small air compressor. I've ridden across country and having tools on hand has really come in handy.

Braided lines make a big difference in how the brakes feel and perform. A good investment IMHO.
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That's a bummer. It really irks me when they tell you something that is not correct.

Since the old seals were not leaking you should be fine cleaning them up and reusing them. Lube them with a little clean brake fluid when installing them, so they slide smoothly in the bores.

Yeah, I kind of expected it though after reading threads about seals for the AJP calipers being nigh impossible to come across.

Anyway, I just finished the job and tested it up and down the road a bit. Seems good! Brakes feel nice and progressive and the front wheel spins more freely.

However, I think I'll be carrying as many tools as possible in my top-box and obsessing over my front brakes like a crazy person every time I stop for the next few days.



After the job. This was my first brake job ever! The first time would've been rear pads on my old GS but that caliper needed a rebuild and I didn't have a garage back then.

Still filthy though unfortunately, my wash stuff didn't come yesterday, thanks to a blunder of my own doing. It ended up at work!

I also planned to replace the hose with a steel hose, but that got put on backorder so that's going to have to wait. People will have to enjoy the sight of a GS500 just as they look in the wild..
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That's a bummer. It really irks me when they tell you something that is not correct.

Since the old seals were not leaking you should be fine cleaning them up and reusing them. Lube them with a little clean brake fluid when installing them, so they slide smoothly in the bores.
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It's an 89 gs500 and the battery is brand new and is reading properly as well.
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Tard Farm / Re: Last Post Wins - V3
« Last post by peteGS on Today at 07:39:06 PM »
Cheers ShowBiz!! I can only agree  :icon_mrgreen: :cheers:
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Short the starter relay ? this aint no 1980's Yamaha.
You may have a dead battery.
Cool.
Buddha.
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I have been having some issues with wiring, FI ALLY figured out where the short was and fixed it. However when I try to start my bike nothing happens not even a click on the starter relay. The fuse and diode are all brand new. If I short out the starter relat it tries to turn over. My first question is I am not sure if I have the wires hooked properly on the relay can anyone show me a pic or how to attach the wires properly? I have an 89 so my relay is without the fuse it just has 2 screw studs and 2 tabs for the wires to plug in to. Thanks for any help
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Nice video Kito!  Good choice of music too  :cool:

Looks like you've got a great workshop to tinker.  Where are you located?

Have you had a chance to take the bike out for a test ride?  On your brake level, I'd keep a close eye on that rubber band replacing the return spring.  Rubber is likely to crack and corrode, especially if close to the heat of the exhaust.
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