Author Topic: New bike time! (Monster 821!)  (Read 8481 times)

Offline Bluesmudge

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2019, 08:41:02 AM »
$17,000 seems crazy talk to me. I think they are cashing in on the scrambler craze. There is no reason that demo bike should be getting so close to Goldwing type monies.

For about half the price you could get a brand new Aprilia Shiver 900. I think you should look into that bike. 93.8 HP and 66.3 lb-ft of torque with a 480 pound curb weight.


I'm really interested in the Dorsoduro 900 which has the same engine as the Shiver but in an oversized-super-moto style. Seems like a lot of bike for under $10,000 OTD. I'v heard of demo mdels leaving the dealer for under $8k.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 08:51:17 AM by Bluesmudge »

Offline cbrfxr67

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2019, 12:04:18 PM »
REALLY enjoyed your take on (zero) those bikes watcher!  Thanks for sharing,... (go ride somemore that was great stuff!)
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Offline Watcher

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2019, 01:24:39 AM »
Well. If a scrambler 1100 is in the equation then that opens up a lot of options. I think the 800 is a magical formula and decent price but the 1100 is just too big in all categories, especially price. And for >15k it should be perfect.

17k. You could get a scrambler icon and the Honda for that money.

Did you check out a speed/street triple? Or xsr900?

The 1100 was kind of an impulse thing, truth be told.  I hit my guy up like "What demos do you have?" and he returned with "We've got an 1100 with a pipe on it, it's pretty sweet, I think you'll like it better than the 800."  Then I geared up and went and test rode it.
Like I said, I liked it, but I didn't like like it.

I'm going to go back and check out the 800 series.  They have an 18 Icon for like $8500, but I'm hearing that the 19 Scramblers are quite a bit better.  They re-tuned the EFI, it has a much better dashboard, slightly better suspension, LEDs all around, and an updated seat.  The price did go up, but a very reasonable amount.  Depending on the deal they can offer me on the 18 vs ordering in a 19 may make the decision between the two, because I don't think I need the updated feature set but I would like the updated feature set.
But first I have to ride one.


I have looked at some of the Speed/Street Triples.  I like them, but I don't get too excited over them.  I'd have to ride one to get a better opinion.
I have ridden an FZ09 and I didn't really like it, truth be told.  They're cool bikes, but I don't think I'd ever own one.  The Street Triple is a lot smaller of a bike, though, so that could be a different story.  Less hooligan and more sport-naked.  Eh, I'd take it or leave it.
XSR900 is the same story.  Don't really like it.  I'd much prefer the 700.


For about half the price you could get a brand new Aprilia Shiver 900. I think you should look into that bike. 93.8 HP and 66.3 lb-ft of torque with a 480 pound curb weight.


Actually, I have looked into the Shiver.  I like the appearance, the sound, and the engine, especially since it's less maintenance than a Duc, and the local shop has one stickered at, I think, $9.5k.  But there are a few problems with it:
Hot seat exhaust + Arizona =  :nono:
Aftermarket support basically doesn't exist.

When I put that bike into any of my vendors I come back with basically just brake pads and oil filters.  My company's website lists like 4 direct fit components, where as for a Monster I get more like 4 pages of direct fit stuff.
There's literally one exhaust system I can get for it, it's an Akro, it's $1000, and it's on closeout meaning once they're gone, they're gone.
A bike that is nearly 100% dependent on the dealer is not the bike for me.  It's cool, but I just can't do it.

REALLY enjoyed your take on (zero) those bikes watcher!  Thanks for sharing,... (go ride somemore that was great stuff!)

Glad you enjoyed it!  Here's a quick vid of me riding it!  Sorry it's so short and uncut, my camera died into the ride and didn't catch my interstate ride and I was too lazy to edit out the boring red-light.



I'm going to use this space to kind of talk out loud.  I feel like it'll help me articulate some of my thoughts, and I'd appreciate any comments on anything I mention.


I think with 90% certainty my next bike is going to be another Ducati.  Many things I like about mine are so purely Ducati, I don't think I'd enjoy any other bike the same way.  The way it sounds, the way it looks, the fit/finish, the charm of it not being purely about the performance and more about the experience, and although I'm not a vain person I love the prestige.  Ducati has that name that people look up to, it feels good when someone compliments the bike you ride, and as someone who works where I work with the position I have I feel like that type of motorcycle represents me well as a proper enthusiast.
I've also had this Ducati longer than any other bike I've owned.  Much longer.  It's over 2 years already, and my average length of ownership is typically measured in months.

There's also the fact that the guys at the local Ducati shop actually seem to give a crap.
They often show up to my store's bike nights, as well as drop by to show off new toys and things.  I've gone there for service and had them charge me pennies on the dollar "because".  Every time I go there I get greeted by the staff, can help myself to the little drink fridge, can just stand around and BS if I want.  They send customers my way, and I do likewise.
I've been emailing the sales manager back and forth asking about prices on different machines and he's been polite, helpful, and all around willing to answer all of my questions so far, and I got invited back to test ride other bikes.

I go to the local "big box" dealerships and get basically ignored by everyone.  If I'm not there tossing hundred dollar bills around, I guess they won't give me the time of day.
So I feel better supporting the local Ducatistas.


With that out of the way, there are two major contenders, the first of which is a Scrambler Icon 800.

It's relatively cheap, which is a plus, and it's arguably very good for my typical use.  It's got decently plush suspension, and the roads out here can be terribad in some spots.  It's also a more willing platform for luggage, and although I typically don't take much with me I would like the ability to load up some bags in order to go get (more) groceries without having to borrow a car or tag along with my roommate.
It would also come in handy being able to pack more stuff for MSF.  I really load up my tank bag and tail-bag as it is, having more room for some extra Gatorades or whatever would be rather welcome.
It's not particularly suited to interstate travel, but I only really do that if I have to teach MSF and that's typically a half hour or so on the interstate and done, so it's just fine.  Maybe cross-country is a stretch, but I'll have to reserve judgement until I ride one and feel how it does at 80mph and how the seat is.

There are also a TON of aftermarket accessories I can get for it.  I've already put together a modest cart off CycleGear's website.  I like it as kind of a pseudo flat-tracker.  I'd do some lower bars with a gauge relocate, little fly-screen/number-plate, CompWerkes exhaust, some engine protection, I found some saddlebag supports that look kind of like number plates, fender delete, and I'd get the black aluminum gas-tank side-covers from Ducat.  I think I could really enjoy that, and it would be a perfect little commuter/utility bike.

Couple of hangups, though.  First is the wheels.  180/55-17 for the rear.  Perfect!  110/80-18 for the front.  Hang on!  I'm finding mostly options in dual-sport, some older oddball touring tires, and some cruiser tires.  To me the perfect tire right now is the Michelin Road 5, and that's not available...
I would very rarely if ever take this bike onto dirt roads even, so I don't really need or want DS tires, it's not a cruiser and while it would probably get insane mileage on a set of cruiser tires I don't think the performance would be enough to really enjoy the sportiness of the Scrambler.  And I don't particularly jump at the sight of any of the sport-touring options.
I get it, it's a Scrambler, it's a "go everywhere" type of machine, but tires are pretty damn important and I feel like if I can't find a tire I really like on there it'll keep me from fully enjoying the machine.
I've looked into it a little and there doesn't even seem to be a 17" wheel available for it.  The Scrambler "Cafe" uses a 17" front wheel, but it's also a spoked wheel and, as such, is a tube type, and I'll be damned if I'm going to use tubes on a street machine.

The second is that while the Scrambler is a "sporty" and fun little bike, it's not really a "sport" machine.  I've no doubt that I could have fun on it on the twisty mountain roads, but a proper street bike is more my style on the weekends.
Well, no problem, I can get something more sport focused for when I want to ride more aggressively on the weekends, and it's something I've been wanting for a long time.  I would love a little Ninja 300 or something similar to canyon carve, but I do have a problem with space right now.  I park on my patio because there's not a parking space available, and I'm going to be living that apartment life for the foreseeable future, so I'm kind of limited to one bike right now.  There's also the fact that a down payment and monthlies on a new Scrambler is going to make it harder to save up for a little Ninja, so it's going to delay what I really need to fulfill my wants in motorcycles.


But then I thought, maybe the perfect bike has been staring me in the face this whole time.  A bike that's a great commuter, light duty utility, and short interstate travel machine.  It's also really sporty and can be ridden like a race bike in the twisties.  It's a machine that's iconic, looks great, sounds great, and is comfortable.  One that can potentially satisfy me better than any other bike.
One that I've already owned for 2+ years, that has been that almost perfect machine.
A Monster.

Specifically a Monster 821.

Especially the current version, as Ducati went with a more classic style that hearkens back to the Monster that I have.
It's updated with better technology.  It's stronger, faster, stoppier ( :dunno_black: ), has an engine that is more reliable and has a significantly longer service interval than most other Ducatis (including the Scrambler), not to mention has that iconic look, sound, feel, essence!
It has proper 17" wheels front and rear.
I know it's comfortable, I know it's a great commuter, I know it's great on a mountain road, I know I'd love it.  The main reason I don't want my Monster any more is it's getting a little long in the tooth.  A newer, younger, better Monster is the perfect replacement!
... or is it?

It's about $3000 more expensive, doesn't have quite the extensive list of aftermarket toys, and isn't as luggage friendly.  It won't offer me any more versatility than I already have, and will be at higher risk of theft.


Test riding both may be the deciding factor.  If I ride the Scrambler and I'm like "Hell yeah, this is perfect!  I can have a ton of fun on this!" I'll probably go for that one.  If I react how I reacted to the 1100, maybe not, I'll probably pursue another Monster.
Who knows, I might ride the Monster and be like "meh, it's too much of the same," or it might reignite that spark and remind me why I fell in love my Monster so much...

I haven't had this hard of a time with picking out a bike before.  I've always kind of just flown by the seat of my pants and gone with my instincts.
GS650GL?  That's cool looking, price is right, got it.
GS500E?  A little sportier, price is right, way more comfortable, got it.
A second GS500E?  The obvious!
CB500F?  Hey, it's basically an EFI GS, little more powerful, sounds a little cooler, got it.
Buell XB12?  It looks cool, it's really unique, decent price, lets get it!
Monster 750?  A little old, but it's beautiful.  Always liked the look, maintenance isn't too bad, lets get it!

CB650F?  CB650R?  XSR700?  Z650?  Another CB500F?  CBR500R?  Triple?  Scrambler?  Monster?
My head is spinning.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2019, 01:44:35 AM by Watcher »
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Offline mr72

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2019, 05:20:00 AM »
Well a monster 797 is basically the same bike as a scrambler 800 but in more sport naked clothing.  Same engine, nearly the same frame and suspension, right? Different appearance and ergos. So maybe add it to your list?

All of your reasons to stick with Ducati are very compelling. Only big downside is cost of ownership. For example I have a coworker whose brother has a monster that got hit in a parking garage, same year model as my triumph. Tank is dented. A new painted tank is $2800 reportedly.  Now, when I was shopping for my triumph there was a 2014 with virtually no miles on it and a crushed tank and I priced a new painted tank and it was only $900. That's a huge difference. I would imagine parts you can only get from the manufacturer like wheels, swingarm, etc. are similarly priced. The Duc probably has as much aftermarket as a Bonneville but I bet aftermarket parts are also priced higher.

But still, if I was buying a new sporty motorcycle I'd have a hard time not getting a monster, for many of the reasons you mentioned. And as you might remember, I seriously considered a scrambler when I bought my triumph. A monster 695 is still on my list. If one shows up on Craigslist this winter after I have a big commission check in the bank I will likely snap it up. A fuel injected m900 could also get my attention.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2019, 04:29:26 AM by mr72 »

Offline Watcher

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2019, 11:35:05 PM »
I'll have to check out the 797.  On paper it seems like the proper modern equivalent to mine while the 821 seems a bit of an upgrade, based on performance and features.
The 797 engine makes 73/49 HP/FtLbs and is air cooled while the 821 makes 109/63 and is liquid cooled. The 821 in "rain mode" almost exactly makes the 797's power, so the 821 essentially has a 797 within it.
My M750 claims 62/45, to put it in perspective, with a typical slide carb throttle response.  Both of the new ones are EFI, of course, with the 797 being cable throttle and the 821 being electronic "fly by wire" throttle.

The 797 is cheaper by about $3k, but has the 7.5k mile Desmo-service while the 821 has the 18k mile service, so cost of ownership over the period of even the loan would about equal out on the two (Desmo-service costs about $1000, the rate that I ride I'd need to service the 797 yearly while the 821 would be basically a 3 year interval).

Also, for the extra $3k I'd get the TFT display, proper traction control with the Bosch cornering ABS, and can choose either the classic Ducati yellow or an interesting black, red, and silver "Stealth" color, where as the 797 only comes in cliche' Ducati red and a white on black frame, neither of which I particularly adore.  I typically go atypical with color, so I'm naturally averse to a red Ducati   That being said, my boss has a white Ducati and I kinda don't want to start a white Ducati bandwagon.  I also like the contrast of the red 797 compared to the white, and the more I see it the more it grows on me, but classic yellow would be much preferred.

The 797 is slightly smaller and lighter, which is a plus...

Hard call, but I'm leaning 821.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2019, 01:12:33 AM by Watcher »
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Offline Watcher

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #25 on: May 22, 2019, 05:15:17 PM »
Test road the Monster 821 and a Scrambler Icon.  I attempted to video record both of them, but my test ride of the Monster apparently didn't record and my ride of the Scrambler referenced it pretty heavily so I can't really share either, unfortunately.

The good news is I got a definitive opinion about them both.  They didn't have a Monster 797 to ride but with the same engine as the Scrambler I think I got enough of an idea about it to know what it's all about.

First of all the Scrambler.
In a word: disappointing.  Now let me clarify that a little; it was disappointing to me.  Overall it felt like a great bike, but like the 1100 there were a lot of things I would have to change about it to make it satisfactory as a daily riding machine.

The riding position is very upright, so much so that you really have to hang on when you put the power down.  You sit on top of the bike, and it feels very much like sitting on a chair.  In contrast, the Monster hangs on to you.  It's slightly leaned forward, the pegs are set higher and further back, when you put the power on you're already in the ideal position.
The seat was also quite firm, and in combination with the riding position you really feel a lot of the bumps and cracks in the road directly applied to your butt.  The Monster's suspension was a bit firmer, but while you felt the bumps and such a little bit more they were transferred to your springy arms and legs more than your rear.

The steering was quite interesting as well.  Both bikes felt very nimble, but the Scrambler felt less like it wanted to be in turns.  Once you put the Monster in the curve it was very much in the curve.  The Scrambler was like "ok, we're turning, but when are we done?"  It felt well planted and sure footed, but also felt like it naturally wanted to stand up, where as the Monster waited for you to tell it to stand back up.
Surprisingly, the Monster also seemed to do better at low speed.  U-turns felt to me like I could get a tighter corner on the Monster than on the Scrambler, despite expecting the opposite.
How much of it is personal bias from owning a Monster and knowing it's chassis compared to the Scrambler just being less willing to tighten up I can't say, I'd have to have someone else ride them side by side and tell me otherwise.
Could also be the result of that 18" front wheel.

Despite both being naked bikes, it also felt like the Scrambler experienced more wind buffeting, perhaps just a symptom of being more properly upright.

And the last thing was the engine.  It was very peppy and not too vibey, but it felt like it ran out of power too quickly.  When really launching from a stop it was pulling and then suddenly would hit the rev limit, which to me was a case of "we're shifting already?!"  It may just be the gearing.  The Scrambler is geared relatively low, and it's got good takeoff, but you expect it to pull longer than it does.
I guess it's a good sign that it seems to pull well 'till redline, but it just doesn't seem to give you that much feedback when you're winding it up.  Incredibly linear power delivery, if you ride it like a commuter it's a great feeling, but if you wind it out to have fun on it the bike seems to not really give you any kind of torque curve or sensation of a powerband.
It also felt a little lacking on the interstate.  It has good enough power, but the combination of the lower gearing, the lack of being able to feel a powerband, and the poor wind buffeting led to a bike that would be very fatiguing to ride any sort of distance on the highway.

Overall, I still thought it was a cool little bike, but for my wants/needs it fell far short of expectation.  I'll still recommend it to someone who wants exactly that: a Scrambler.  But, it's not for me.


The Monster, on the other hand, what a machine!  "Smooth" is a good word to describe it in just about every way.  Compared to the Scrambler I felt the seat was much softer, the riding position much more pleasurable, the acceleration much more effortless both in terms of the engine's willingness and in my body's reaction to it, and in overall handling.
It felt a lot more stable, both compared to the Scrambler and even to my Monster, but despite this stability it felt just as nimble and willing to turn as my Monster.
Part of that is due to the difference in tires, I'm sure.  My Monster uses a 160/60 rear, while the 821 I rode uses a 180/55.  The difference in sensation is quite profound.  Whereas my Monster feels like it want to fall effortlessly into the corners, this Monster feels like it wants to roll effortlessly into the corners.  That's not even a 100% apt way to put the feeling into words.  The bikes feel the same weight and require the same effort to "turn in," but my 750 is like "Turning! WOOO!  Aww YEEEah!" while the 821 is like "Sweet, we're getting curvy here."
Both are light and smooth and willing to turn, but the 750 just want's to jump in with both feet and the 821 is a little more... calculated?
Either way, it felt great!  Sometimes on my Monster it feels like if you let go in a corner the bike will keep leaning.  On the 821 it felt like if you let go it would hold the line.  Loved it!

The power was awesome too.  It never felt a lack of torque, even low in the RPM range.  A couple of 6th gear pulls I did with RPMs low, while not the most spectacular pull away, were smooth.  No low RPM shudders or struggling from the engine, just steady power.
That being said, right around 7-9K RPM you felt a little more start to come on, but it's not a large enough increase to catch you off guard.  It feels like you've got 80% power from the get-go and once you pass that threshold you've got 100%.  It's pulling hard from the start, and at that RPM the bike would, if it could, give you a wink and a nod and then give you just a little bit extra.

Suspension was stiff, but not uncomfortably so.  All the little bumps and cracks and such that I normally encounter were smooth enough, but some more cracked up pavement was a little jarring.  Due to the riding position it never really transferred to my body uncomfortably, however it was definitely a "sportier" ride than my 750 delivers.

Brakes were amazing.  Radial mounted Brembos, not much more to talk about.

All in all it felt very familiar to my Monster 750, but more refined, more powerful, dare I even say more comfortable?  It's pretty much what I expected, and riding it was the confirmation I needed to stick with the Monster platform.


Re: the 797, I don't think it would be as wise of an investment.  After riding the Scrambler and getting an idea of how that engine behaves, it would basically just be my bike.  Not that I'm unsatisfied with my 750, but it's not enough of an upgrade, I don't think.  If I were to put my 750 into a time altering device and bring it to 2019 it would be the 797.  Part of my wanting a new bike is to also get an upgrade, not just an update.
The 821 also has the rider modes, beautiful TFT display, and 3x the service interval, so I think it's well worth the extra $3k.


So I think an 821 is going to be my next bike.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2019, 05:22:24 PM by Watcher »
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Offline mr72

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #26 on: May 23, 2019, 11:06:13 AM »
Nice! Cool review too.

I agree the 797 is probably more of an updated version of your 750 rather than really an upgrade. If it were me I'd want to stick with air cooled but you can't really upgrade while doing that.

Offline Watcher

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #27 on: May 23, 2019, 01:40:23 PM »
Nice! Cool review too.

I agree the 797 is probably more of an updated version of your 750 rather than really an upgrade. If it were me I'd want to stick with air cooled but you can't really upgrade while doing that.

I do like the air cooled aspect, too, but the liquid cooling is higher performance.
And in this case going with the more technically advanced engine is yielding lower maintenance, so that's a plus.  Dealing with coolant once a year is a good trade-off for not dealing with valves once a year.
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Offline mr72

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #28 on: May 23, 2019, 05:47:24 PM »
Yeah it's the dealing with loss of coolant in the field or the failure of a water pump that bothers me.

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #29 on: May 23, 2019, 06:07:40 PM »
Yeah it's the dealing with loss of coolant in the field or the failure of a water pump that bothers me.

I'm not usually out "in the field" though.

For a Scrambler or Desert Sled it makes 100% sense to avoid liquid cooling.
For a city bike it's not as big a concern.



I went ahead and uploaded my test ride of the Scrambler, in case anyone is interested in my opinion of it "in the moment".

« Last Edit: May 23, 2019, 08:11:11 PM by Watcher »
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Offline mr72

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #30 on: May 24, 2019, 05:14:29 AM »
I'm not usually out "in the field" though.

What I mean is at an unexpected time when you are not in your garage doing planned maintenance. Running one trip past a scheduled valve adjustment won't leave you stranded but the most minor of cooling system issues will. To me, water cooling on a motorcycle is just too much risk without sufficient benefit.

That said, my Triumph has a huge oil cooler with nearly the same risks of water cooling. The only consolation is that due to the risk of losing all of the oil in seconds they really beef up the lines and fittings to reduce the chances that getting knocked over while parked and landing against an object or kicked up road debris won't put a hole in the cooler or sever the lines. But radiators and hoses are rarely built this way. A split or cut radiator hose will end your ride just as much as a broken oil cooler line but manufacturers seem to regard it as an inconvenience rather than a disaster. If I'm 2 hours from home in the middle of the vast Texas ranchland or hill country and I have to get towed home, that's a disaster in my book regardless of if it's just coolant that got blown out or oil.

Anyway, sorry to rant on your thread. Truly I'm resigned to the fact that the next new motorcycle I will buy will likely be water cooled. I'm sort of in mourning about this reality. Long live air cooled motorcycles and their crazy frequent maintenance!

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #31 on: May 24, 2019, 10:17:20 AM »
Anyway, sorry to rant on your thread.

No problem at all, I actually welcome it.  Any concerns you may have are good to consider for me, especially as a sole vehicle.
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Offline mr72

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #32 on: May 25, 2019, 06:20:14 AM »
Any concerns you may have are good to consider for me, especially as a sole vehicle.

I didn't even think about that, but it's an excellent point. If I were in your position with a big wide open Western state to explore and only by bike to get me anywhere I think I'd have AAA who will bring coolant and I'd carry enough spare hoses and clamps as necessary plus probably some JB quick and duct tape to prepare for a roadside repair of a failed cooling system part. I'm just paranoid about cooling system issues from water cooled engines made by companies who have the bulk of their experience building air cooled engines after owning two water cooled VWs and an Audi all of which had one or another disastrous cooling failure way too often.

There's just no way to do preventative maintenance and avoid a piece of wire that gets thrown from the back of a truck and winds up ripping a coolant hose or a 1/2" lag bolt bouncing off the pavement that your radiator hits at 70mph. At least in a car these parts are more or less protected by bodywork, and you can carry spare coolant. I even added a mesh grille behind the open slots on my Jeep to keep rocks out of the radiator. Been stranded way too many times with anti freeze on the wrong side of the engine.

Don't get me wrong. For sure a water cooled engine is more durable and reliable over like 50k miles on average. But over a specific 50 mile ride, there's just more to break.

Offline Watcher

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #33 on: May 29, 2019, 04:07:23 PM »
I'm just paranoid about cooling system issues from water cooled engines made by companies who have the bulk of their experience building air cooled engines. after owning two water cooled VWs and an Audi all of which had one or another disastrous cooling failure way too often.

There's just no way to do preventative maintenance and avoid a piece of wire that gets thrown from the back of a truck and winds up ripping a coolant hose or a 1/2" lag bolt bouncing off the pavement that your radiator hits at 70mph.
Don't get me wrong. For sure a water cooled engine is more durable and reliable over like 50k miles on average. But over a specific 50 mile ride, there's just more to break.

I've never personally been stranded by a liquid cooled vehicle because of the cooling system, and my experience is with two Jeeps, a Hyundai, a VW, and my Honda CB500F.
Doesn't mean it won't ever happen, but I don't consider them inherently unreliable.
That being said, the only cooling issue I've ever run into was a stuck thermostat in my VW Golf.  Luckily it was stuck open, so it never resulted in an overheating condition.  Unluckily, it was the middle of Chicago winter and it meant I basically didn't have heat.


I guess it's always wise to consider Murphy's Law, but the idea of a piece of debris targeting the cooling system as an extra hazard is a little unwarranted to me.  I mean, my Monster has a "radiator" of sorts as it is, if you consider the massive oil-cooler up front.  It's been bashed by rocks and bugs and has some dings in it but nothing substantial, Ducati made it relatively beefy, presumably so in case it did get smacked by a rock it wouldn't immediately dump all the oil out.
Plus the way the Monster 821 has the coolant hoses routed they're behind the radiator on the left side of the engine, very much out of the way of impact from stones and stuff coming from the front.  A torn hose is an incredibly unlikely scenario.



Speaking of Murphy's Law, I scheduled someone to come test ride my Monster and in talking to him decided I should switch my bike from GP-shift back to a standard shift pattern.
While adjusting the linkage, this happened.



The Duc must know I'm trying to sell it, lol!
« Last Edit: May 29, 2019, 04:09:19 PM by Watcher »
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Offline Watcher

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #34 on: June 06, 2019, 11:43:09 PM »
Is it wrong of me to be selective with a buyer?  I mean, cash is cash, right?

Guy came and looked at it today, despite not having the linkage yet, and really wants to commit to buying it.  Everyone else who is interested wants to wait for me to get the parts, but he was anxious to see it so he came out tonight and looked at it, and he brought my asking price in cash.
But...  I don't know, I could have taken his money, given him the title, then let him know once the parts were in for pickup, but instead I told him to hang onto his cash for the time being until I got the parts because "I don't know how much longer it will be and I don't want to tie up your money with nothing to deliver..."

He was kind of janky; 100% squid, was slightly incoherent over the phone, and he showed up on a Buell Blast that was totally trashed.  Both fork seals blown and oil residue on the front tire, it was one of the worst rattle can paint jobs I've ever seen, the gauge was broken off and hanging by wires, the ignition wasn't attached to anything, missing half the intake system, and had bolt-on lights everywhere.
I made some jabs at it for being a Blast, how they weren't designed super great and how even Eric Buell himself hated them, and he got pretty defensive of it, saying how good of a bike it's been to him over the past year or so, how much he likes it, just a little down on power.
So I thought "It's not something he just bought as a fix-er-up-er?  Well then, if he ran that Blast into the ground he's probably gonna mistreat this classic Monster, too."

Is it selfish of me to turn down his money to make sure this bike goes to "a good home"?  I have at least half a dozen other interested parties, it won't be hard to find a buyer, but it also feels weird to tell the guy no "just because."

What do you all think?
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Offline mr72

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #35 on: June 07, 2019, 06:10:58 AM »
I'm totally with you BTW Watcher. But I guess I'm another Euro bike snob.

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #36 on: June 07, 2019, 06:38:10 AM »
I'm with you on that watcher.  If you have a bit of emotional attachment to your bike and you know the dude is going to molest it, I'd probably put him at the bottom of the list.  I think I've done that with every bike I've sold so far.  I hate to see bikes ruined by stupidity. 

I picked up a Voyager Xii parts bike recently and there were trinkets and leds and doodads (a bell on the rear bag support? :dunno_black:).  The wiring was  :2guns: and the back tire was bald.  I think the guy rode it till he had to change the tire and parked it til it wouldnt start again and that was it.  Poor bike
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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #37 on: June 07, 2019, 06:47:00 AM »
I once actually pulled the emergency brake and removed the key in the middle of a test drive of my 240Z. Told the guy there was no way I was selling him the car and drove him back to his motorcycle with cash in his hand. I do admit though that half of that was because I thought he was going to kill us both during the test drive. However to this day I still regret selling that 240Z at all but I had little choice...

Offline qcbaker

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #38 on: June 07, 2019, 07:06:06 AM »
All this talk about janky Blasts makes me acutely aware of how much I'm procrastinating fixing and selling my Blast....

Anyway... Is it wrong of you to be selective with a buyer? Personally, I would say no. Its your bike, if you want it going to someone you're reasonably sure is going to treat it like you think it should be treated, you have the right to do that. You don't HAVE to sell it at all, much less sell it to any one particular person, especially if that person gives you a sketchy vibe. If you sell them the bike, and they get hurt or die because they neglected the bike to the point where its rideworthiness is in question, and you knew that was a possibility before you made the sale, you might feel at least partially responsible (even if technically it isn't your fault). So it could be argued that the safer option for everyone would be to just tell the guy that you got a better offer from another buyer. I think that sellers of any dangerous item have some level of responsibility to ensure that the buyer at the very least understands what they're getting into. And sometimes people SAY they understand, but their actions tell a different story.

You also asked if it was selfish to decline this sale. To that, I have to say: well, yeah. A little. You're depriving someone else the pleasure of owning and riding a great bike just because you want to feel good. But again, I don't necessarily think that's wrong. Maybe your decision not to sell actually is saving his life. Who can say? :dunno_black:

Offline Watcher

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Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Reply #39 on: June 07, 2019, 12:04:45 PM »
Thanks for the words, everyone.

I feel better about my decision here.
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