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General GS500 Discussion / Re: New Paint!
« Last post by Watcher on Today at 12:55:28 AM »
No, it's just normal spray paint. I will try not to spill gas on it, then!  :icon_lol:

Just get a proper clear coat.
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Odds n Ends / Re: New bike time! (CB650F/R?)
« Last post by Watcher on Today at 12:15:17 AM »
Test road the Monster 821 and a Scrambler Icon.  I attempted to video record both of them, but my test ride of the Monster apparently didn't record and my ride of the Scrambler referenced it pretty heavily so I can't really share either, unfortunately.

The good news is I got a definitive opinion about them both.  They didn't have a Monster 797 to ride but with the same engine as the Scrambler I think I got enough of an idea about it to know what it's all about.

First of all the Scrambler.
In a word: disappointing.  Now let me clarify that a little; it was disappointing to me.  Overall it felt like a great bike, but like the 1100 there were a lot of things I would have to change about it to make it satisfactory as a daily riding machine.

The riding position is very upright, so much so that you really have to hang on when you put the power down.  You sit on top of the bike, and it feels very much like sitting on a chair.  In contrast, the Monster hangs on to you.  It's slightly leaned forward, the pegs are set higher and further back, when you put the power on you're already in the ideal position.
The seat was also quite firm, and in combination with the riding position you really feel a lot of the bumps and cracks in the road directly applied to your butt.  The Monster's suspension was a bit firmer, but while you felt the bumps and such a little bit more they were transferred to your springy arms and legs more than your rear.

The steering was quite interesting as well.  Both bikes felt very nimble, but the Scrambler felt less like it wanted to be in turns.  Once you put the Monster in the curve it was very much in the curve.  The Scrambler was like "ok, we're turning, but when are we done?"  It felt well planted and sure footed, but also felt like it naturally wanted to stand up, where as the Monster waited for you to tell it to stand back up.
Surprisingly, the Monster also seemed to do better at low speed.  U-turns felt to me like I could get a tighter corner on the Monster than on the Scrambler, despite expecting the opposite.
How much of it is personal bias from owning a Monster and knowing it's chassis compared to the Scrambler just being less willing to tighten up I can't say, I'd have to have someone else ride them side by side and tell me otherwise.
Could also be the result of that 18" front wheel.

Despite both being naked bikes, it also felt like the Scrambler experienced more wind buffeting, perhaps just a symptom of being more properly upright.

And the last thing was the engine.  It was very peppy and not too vibey, but it felt like it ran out of power too quickly.  When really launching from a stop it was pulling and then suddenly would hit the rev limit, which to me was a case of "we're shifting already?!"  It may just be the gearing.  The Scrambler is geared relatively low, and it's got good takeoff, but you expect it to pull longer than it does.
I guess it's a good sign that it seems to pull well 'till redline, but it just doesn't seem to give you that much feedback when you're winding it up.  Incredibly linear power delivery, if you ride it like a commuter it's a great feeling, but if you wind it out to have fun on it the bike seems to not really give you any kind of torque curve or sensation of a powerband.
It also felt a little lacking on the interstate.  It has good enough power, but the combination of the lower gearing, the lack of being able to feel a powerband, and the poor wind buffeting led to a bike that would be very fatiguing to ride any sort of distance on the highway.

Overall, I still thought it was a cool little bike, but for my wants/needs it fell far short of expectation.  I'll still recommend it to someone who wants exactly that: a Scrambler.  But, it's not for me.


The Monster, on the other hand, what a machine!  "Smooth" is a good word to describe it in just about every way.  Compared to the Scrambler I felt the seat was much softer, the riding position much more pleasurable, the acceleration much more effortless both in terms of the engine's willingness and in my body's reaction to it, and in overall handling.
It felt a lot more stable, both compared to the Scrambler and even to my Monster, but despite this stability it felt just as nimble and willing to turn as my Monster.
Part of that is due to the difference in tires, I'm sure.  My Monster uses a 160/60 rear, while the 821 I rode uses a 180/55.  The difference in sensation is quite profound.  Whereas my Monster feels like it want to fall effortlessly into the corners, this Monster feels like it wants to roll effortlessly into the corners.  That's not even a 100% apt way to put the feeling into words.  The bikes feel the same weight and require the same effort to "turn in," but my 750 is like "Turning! WOOO!  Aww YEEEah!" while the 821 is like "Sweet, we're getting curvy here."
Both are light and smooth and willing to turn, but the 750 just want's to jump in with both feet and the 821 is a little more... calculated?
Either way, it felt great!  Sometimes on my Monster it feels like if you let go in a corner the bike will keep leaning.  On the 821 it felt like if you let go it would hold the line.  Loved it!

The power was awesome too.  It never felt a lack of torque, even low in the RPM range.  A couple of 6th gear pulls I did with RPMs low, while not the most spectacular pull away, were smooth.  No low RPM shudders or struggling from the engine, just steady power.
That being said, right around 7-9K RPM you felt a little more start to come on, but it's not a large enough increase to catch you off guard.  It feels like you've got 80% power from the get-go and once you pass that threshold you've got 100%.  It's pulling hard from the start, and at that RPM the bike would, if it could, give you a wink and a nod and then give you just a little bit extra.

Suspension was stiff, but not uncomfortably so.  All the little bumps and cracks and such that I normally encounter were smooth enough, but some more cracked up pavement was a little jarring.  Due to the riding position it never really transferred to my body uncomfortably, however it was definitely a "sportier" ride than my 750 delivers.

Brakes were amazing.  Radial mounted Brembos, not much more to talk about.

All in all it felt very familiar to my Monster 750, but more refined, more powerful, dare I even say more comfortable?  It's pretty much what I expected, and riding it was the confirmation I needed to stick with the Monster platform.


Re: the 797, I don't think it would be as wise of an investment.  After riding the Scrambler and getting an idea of how that engine behaves, it would basically just be my bike.  Not that I'm unsatisfied with my 750, but it's not enough of an upgrade, I don't think.  If I were to put my 750 into a time altering device and bring it to 2019 it would be the 797.  Part of my wanting a new bike is to also get an upgrade, not just an update.
The 821 also has the rider modes, beautiful TFT display, and 3x the service interval, so I think it's well worth the extra $3k.


So I think an 821 is going to be my next bike.
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General GS500 Discussion / Re: RPM seems to jump
« Last post by TheDooman92 on May 22, 2019, 11:17:26 PM »
Turns out it came down to a simple cable adjustment. You were correct! Thanks for the help, she's running much better now.
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General GS500 Discussion / Replace boots or just o-rings?
« Last post by TheDooman92 on May 22, 2019, 11:07:57 PM »
If there is a vacuum leak at the intake manifold boot(s) should I go about replacing them with brand new boots and o-rings, or just order the o-rings and replace those on their own? Some have told me that the boots themselves are very tolerant and should last a very, very long time...therefore, it would likely be the o-rings that need replacement, while using the stock boots again. So, I was thinking that the source of the leak is likely just the o-rings themselves as they are more prone to wear with heat, seasonal temperature changes, and time.

Should I pursue option 1, or option 2?:
1. Replace intake manifold boots and o-rings
2. Replace o-rings and reuse stock boots.

Thanks kindly to the GSTWINS community!
Best,
Andy.
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Apologizes to ask the same question(s) in previous posts but I am not getting a straight answer or I am getting more confused since I am a noob. Thank you in advance for your patience.

I am sorting though this conflicting information to order the right size(d)(s) of jets for my particular situation.

The GS Twins' Jetting website, http://wiki.gstwins.com/index.php?n=Upgrades.Rejetting, does not have 2009's stock jets' sizes and I am referring these stock sizes.

2004+ Stock - 17.5 Pilots / 60 Mid Main / 130.0 Main

However on the Van Nuys' Suzuki micro fish website, https://shop.suzukiofvannuys.com/fiche_section_detail.asp?section=989747&category=Motorcycles&make=Suzuki&year=2009&fveh=27496, it states my stock sizes are;

JET,PILOT,17.5
JET,MAIN(60)
* I can not seem to find the 3rd size

It seems per my situation, GSTwins' suggest, "K&N Pod or Lunchbox Air Filter + Sports Exhaust = 20/65/145 jet sizes." I have a K&N RU-2970 filter & Core Engineering Slip On. When I showed these jet sizes to the Van Nuys Suzuki guys, they said, "well what sized 20, 65 & 145 do you need? Because I can give you three different 20 and 65 and 145s?" WHAT IS HE TALKING ABOUT? He wants me to pull out the jets so he can get the diameter size (i think) as the service manual supposedly does not list them as each carburetor is different? Again, what he is really saying to me?

@BikerBoy, did you install those GENUINE Mikuni jets? If so, how is it? Especially swapping out mid's? Did it mess up your choking operation?

@herenow, what am I suppose to be pulling from your table? I am reading under 2008 section the following below, clarificaiton as your posts suggests I replace main & pilot jets only correct?

main jet - 130
jet needle - 5DH60

Please and thanks.

As I said over on the other recent posts, don't worry about the mid (Choke) jet, you will just mess up your choke operation.

Going 5 times higher on the main (see table below) seems A LOT to me even for free air filter and open exhaust....

BTW, i tried the cheap chinese jets out and i was surprised by their quality. They ALL measured perfectly with my pin gauges. For 6 bucks you get 6 jets, so 2 each of three different sizes. Shipping can take up to a month though...  Although your mileage may vary depending on your country (Trump and tariffs and all that Jazz)

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Mikuni-carb-N102-221-Main-Jet-PWC-High-Speed-Jets-Kawasaki-KSF-KXF-Polaris-Predator-and/32274435837.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.27424c4dZSirQ6



Those other sizes are for older carbed models. The carbs changed around 2000 or so I believe.

If you show him the part number in the post I linked above, the guy at the store will definitely know which ones.

And yes, replacing the mid did mess up my choke badly lol. I didnt have an exhaust installed then. It was so rich it flooded my airbox. After I switched it back (and played with the idle and fuel mixture screws) my bike was beyond fucky, so I took it to a shop for them to fix (hey, I never said I was good!). They quoted me only 100-200 bucks for examining the carbs and syncing them so its not too bad. I got my bike in the beginning to be reliable and comfortable, not to try and make it fast, because its already plenty fast for my skill level.
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Apologizes to ask the same question(s) in previous posts but I am not getting a straight answer or I am getting more confused since I am a noob. Thank you in advance for your patience.

I am sorting though this conflicting information to order the right size(d)(s) of jets for my particular situation.

The GS Twins' Jetting website, http://wiki.gstwins.com/index.php?n=Upgrades.Rejetting, does not have 2009's stock jets' sizes and I am referring these stock sizes.

2004+ Stock - 17.5 Pilots / 60 Mid Main / 130.0 Main

However on the Van Nuys' Suzuki micro fish website, https://shop.suzukiofvannuys.com/fiche_section_detail.asp?section=989747&category=Motorcycles&make=Suzuki&year=2009&fveh=27496, it states my stock sizes are;

JET,PILOT,17.5
JET,MAIN(60)
* I can not seem to find the 3rd size

It seems per my situation, GSTwins' suggest, "K&N Pod or Lunchbox Air Filter + Sports Exhaust = 20/65/145 jet sizes." I have a K&N RU-2970 filter & Core Engineering Slip On. When I showed these jet sizes to the Van Nuys Suzuki guys, they said, "well what sized 20, 65 & 145 do you need? Because I can give you three different 20 and 65 and 145s?" WHAT IS HE TALKING ABOUT? He wants me to pull out the jets so he can get the diameter size (i think) as the service manual supposedly does not list them as each carburetor is different? Again, what he is really saying to me?

@BikerBoy, did you install those GENUINE Mikuni jets? If so, how is it? Especially swapping out mid's? Did it mess up your choking operation?

@herenow, what am I suppose to be pulling from your table? I am reading under 2008 section the following below, clarificaiton as your posts suggests I replace main & pilot jets only correct?

main jet - 130
jet needle - 5DH60

Please and thanks.

As I said over on the other recent posts, don't worry about the mid (Choke) jet, you will just mess up your choke operation.

Going 5 times higher on the main (see table below) seems A LOT to me even for free air filter and open exhaust....

BTW, i tried the cheap chinese jets out and i was surprised by their quality. They ALL measured perfectly with my pin gauges. For 6 bucks you get 6 jets, so 2 each of three different sizes. Shipping can take up to a month though...  Although your mileage may vary depending on your country (Trump and tariffs and all that Jazz)

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Mikuni-carb-N102-221-Main-Jet-PWC-High-Speed-Jets-Kawasaki-KSF-KXF-Polaris-Predator-and/32274435837.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.27424c4dZSirQ6



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General GS500 Discussion / Re: Electrical short somewhere
« Last post by Ted on May 22, 2019, 05:24:09 PM »
Thanks for that. I had already read what's involved in getting to the ignition switch and was not looking forward to that. Not having a garage or any other kind of shelter really gets in the way of motorcycle work.

My wiring diagram is in black and white, I'll try to locate a colour one on-line.

And thanks for the clarification on short versus open.
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General GS500 Discussion / Re: New Paint!
« Last post by mrdrprof on May 22, 2019, 04:14:23 PM »
Have you switched bulbs over to LED bulbs? Especially the tail light bulbs. Swapping them out might help with the flickering.

The only LEDs are the gauge lights, the "dash" lights (not sure what they're called), and the headlight. I will try getting some LEDs for the brake light and turn signals and see if that helps

is it gas resistant paint? painted my tank black, but spilled some gas and it melted straight away

No, it's just normal spray paint. I will try not to spill gas on it, then!  :icon_lol:
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General GS500 Discussion / Re: Electrical short somewhere
« Last post by mr72 on May 22, 2019, 04:06:57 PM »

Is there another fuse box somewhere? Does this GS500e only have the one 20 amp fuse for everything? Please tell me there's another fuse....

There are a couple of fuses but mostly the main 20A one. If everything is dead and that fuse is intact then you've done your work to check what needs to be checked.

Has to be no power or no ground for everything to be dead. Start at the source. Be sure there's power at the ignition switch, and on both poles when it's 'on'. Check ground continuity at the negative battery terminal vs. the frame in a few spots and ensure that the ground side of things like the ignition switch and the handlebar on/off switch is also zero ohms to the battery terminal (or very close to zero.. like not >1 ohm). And check power at the handlebar switch when ignition is on.

You really just have to trace wires and check every one starting from the battery and use the wiring diagram as a guide. That's the only way to do it. There's no really common cause of this kind of failure.


Oh, and by the way, this isn't a "short", most likely. A short would cause the fuse to blow. This is an "open".
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General GS500 Discussion / Re: Electrical short somewhere
« Last post by Ted on May 22, 2019, 03:33:27 PM »
Now I remember how much I hate tracking down electrical gremlins when I want to be riding. Main 20 amp fuse is good, test light indicates power going there. Ground cable runs into the engine, shows no crimping or worn housing anywhere; to check inside I would have to take off the gearshift lever, then remove engine case and hope that's all. No crimping or worn housings that I can see anywhere around the triple trees, and nothing worn or touching inside the headlight shell.

Is there another fuse box somewhere? Does this GS500e only have the one 20 amp fuse for everything? Please tell me there's another fuse....
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