Author Topic: tire installation - not too bad  (Read 7050 times)

Offline debtman7

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tire installation - not too bad
« on: April 29, 2007, 01:13:37 AM »

Well, given the choice of $50 for mounting and balancing tires or $16 for a pair of 12" tire irons from eBay that would last many tire installs, I opted for the cheaper option. Overall it went pretty well.

Here is my deluxe bead breaker:



It was carefully built using a 2x4 I had laying around, and 3 nails. It did the job. The rear tire was somewhat tough as the 2x4 kept threatening to break, but a little bounding took care of that. All in all, breaking the bead on both sides took less than a minute and cost exactly $0 assuming you have nails and spare wood around. You could build a much tougher one (the 2x4 arm on mine tended to wiggle around) but for something you'll use maybe once a year, I'm all about quick and dirty.

After the bead was broken I removed the tires. Getting the first edge over was pretty easy. I used some rim protectors which did the job, but next time I'll probably use cut up milk jugs. The rim protectors tended to pop off when you were putting on some serious leverage so I have a few scratches now... Getting the second edge over on the rear wheel was a real pain. It took me two hours, but that also included many breaks and dealing with a baby... most of the online tutorials and videos said you could get the second edge over just by pulling on it, but I had no such luck. What eventually worked was using the tire irons, putting one right next to the other and prying, then moving the first right next to the second. Walking it around this way got it off pretty quickly. The front tire was *MUCH* easier, I had it off in about 3 minutes.

After the tires were off, I replaced the stems with metal ones and mounted the new tires. They went on pretty easy, much easier than taking it off. Only had to pry in 3 places and they were on.

For balancing, I used my deluxe balancing rig which made full use of my engineering degree:



Again, cost was $0 and construction about 30 seconds, built entirely with spare 2x4 scraps and 4 nails. Is it sturdy? Nope. Did it work? Yep. Just put the axle through the wheel, put it on the 2x4's with carefully cut out half circles. The heavy spot immediately fell to the bottom. I used some masking tape to put wheel weights on the top and tweaked it until it no longer favored a single spot. Balancing took maybe 3 minutes per wheel. I think I got them pretty good. The only thing I'll caution is that finding stick on wheel weights is rather difficult. I struck out at every auto parts store, and the tire shop I stopped by only had clip on ones (I didn't know if car ones would work on a motorcycle wheel). I managed to find some at Jeg's, a local high performance auto parts store (think every dream part for a guy with a mid 70's muscle car), so I would recommend planning ahead and ordering some.

Overall, the total cost to do this would be the cost of tire irons, a few 2x4's if you don't have any, some nails, and new valve stems (no absolutely necessary but not a bad idea). I got the tire irons for $16 shipped on eBay. With more tire changes, it will definately save a lot of money. Now that I've done it, I think I can do it again in less than an hour including wheel removal.

Offline bucks1605

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2007, 01:27:16 AM »
Nice work, what tires did you end up buying?
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Offline dgyver

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2007, 01:34:13 AM »
Great work.

btw....you can the stick-on weights on ebay for fairly cheap.
Common sense in not very common.

Offline gsJack

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2007, 02:14:53 AM »
Best bead breaker I ever had was an old Ford Escort.  Slid the tire/wheel under the side and placed the jack base on the tire near the rim and jacked it up a bit and it poped loose.  Turned over and repeated.

Bought one long curved lip tire iron and used a large screwdriver with it.  Pried the tire over the rim lip and stuck in the screwdriver to hold it and then worked around the wheel with the tire iron.

Used dish washing soap for lube, wiped some on the rim with a rag before prying tire off and then wiped some on the bead of the new tire before putting it on.  Worked great.

Never balanced them, used good tires and left the old weights on and put the dot on the tire by the valve stem.  With cast wheels most of the balance weight is for the wheel.  When I take them in now they take off the weights, put on the new tire, and then balance by putting about the same amount of weight back on in the same place.  Never had a problem with tire balance on the ones I mounted for years.

« Last Edit: April 29, 2007, 02:19:52 AM by gsJack »
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Offline debtman7

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2007, 11:13:43 AM »
Nice work, what tires did you end up buying?

They are maxxis promaxx tires. Since this is our first bike and we're not going to be pushing it for a while, I figure they're adequate :) And every review I could find on them was positive, although there weren't a whole lot of reviews to go on. People say the Cheng Shin tires are basically what top of the line tires would have been 20 years ago, so I figure the maxxis are more like what top of the line tires would have been 5 years ago, and I'm ok with that.

I'd post a review later on but seeing as these will be the first tires we've ever ridden on with the first bike we've ever had, I don't really have anything else to compare to until I put my next set on in a year or two...

Offline ohgood

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2007, 11:04:31 PM »
I can't wait to have a garage again.

Good job stickin it to the stealership.

:)


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Offline mjn12

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2007, 01:04:18 AM »
i wish I was brave like you.  I had to replace my front tire recently and I decided to take the $25 hit and have them mount and balance while I was there

Offline debtman7

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2007, 05:51:02 PM »
i wish I was brave like you.  I had to replace my front tire recently and I decided to take the $25 hit and have them mount and balance while I was there

Be brave!

Wasn't bad at all. If it weren't for the issues getting the second lip of the rear wheel over, I'd have been done with the changing and balancing in about 45 minutes. And with more frequent tire changes, knowing how to do it will save in the long run. Granted, if I could find someplace that would do it for $10 per wheel I'd probably go there...

As for the balancing, on the rear I should have left the weights on... I ended up adding weight at the same spot (opposite the valve stem) so I should have just left the weights on. Oh well... The front wheel had no weight on it though, and once the new tire on it was way out of wack. Oddly enough, the heavy spot wasn't the valve stem either. If the valve stem was on the bottom, the heavy spot as right around 8 o'clock. Took two weights opposite that to balance it, so I'm guessing that the wheel wasn't anywhere near balanced before...

Offline dgyver

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2007, 06:39:10 PM »
I always check the balance of the wheel without the tire to find the heavy spot. It is not always the valve stem. Typically it is not the tire you are balancing but instead the wheel.
Common sense in not very common.

Offline ducati_nolan

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2007, 07:03:26 PM »
So other than a scratch or two there wasn't any dammage to the wheel? I was always worried about bending the rim

Offline bucks1605

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2007, 07:42:39 PM »
i wish I was brave like you.  I had to replace my front tire recently and I decided to take the $25 hit and have them mount and balance while I was there

That's what I did.
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Offline debtman7

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2007, 01:02:40 AM »
So other than a scratch or two there wasn't any dammage to the wheel? I was always worried about bending the rim

No damage. Honestly, if you are using enough force to bend the rim, you're doing something wrong. As long as you kneel on the tire to center the bead on the rim, the opposite side has enough room to come over the wheel fairly easily. If you work in small sections with the irons (prying up a piece, then prying 3-4" away, then another 3-4" away, etc) it really takes surprisingly little force to get it off (or on).

Offline galahs

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2007, 08:46:26 AM »
Wow this topic is fascinating.

I never thought you could balance your own wheel.


Further reading on balancing your own wheels can be found here: http://www.motorcyclenews.com/MCN/advice/searchresults/MCN-Articles/2005/Sep28-05-How-to-balance-your-wheels/?&R=EPI-690


more info on how to remove an old tire and placing a new tire on the rim can be found here
http://www.motorcyclenews.com/MCN/advice/searchresults/MCN-Articles/2005/Sep21-05-How-to-change-your-own-tyres/?&R=EPI-688.

Tyre removal, fitting and balancing
http://clarity.net/~adam/tire-changing-doc.html



Offline ohgood

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2007, 01:40:18 PM »
Good show ! If your bead breaker is a little flimsy, try turning your lever on it's side before assembling. Less bounce, more strength.

That is one really nice looking ride. What year is it, and how many miles ?


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Offline CndnMax

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #14 on: September 19, 2007, 09:15:42 PM »
Acrylic model paint works great to touch up the rims, i got a few nicks on mine from taking off the caliper  :icon_rolleyes: you wont be able to tell unless you know its there.  :thumb:

Offline warpzone

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Re: tire installation - not too bad
« Reply #15 on: September 20, 2007, 10:41:15 AM »
Oooo I'm really happy about this thread. Picking up my bike today and I know it's going to need the tires replaced. I really hate not doing something myself, especially when the total time required is less then it would be to go to the dealer and wait and wait and wait.

Thanks for the supplement tutorial! Didn't know you could balance tires yourself, either. I thought it took one of those fancy-shmancy wirly-gigs.  :icon_mrgreen: