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max lean, plus fork lock?

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Phil B:
Sooo.. has any of you whacky track racers, ever gotten to such an extreme corner, that you were practically scraping the pegs, and also had the handlebars basically turned to the locking point?


I have not... and I'm scared to try it.


I was going around a corner today   (regular road, flat, but very wide corner, open area) at lets say 30mph.


I got overenthusiastic about my lean setup, and was practically dragging a knee (heck I probably could have if I had my knee out  :embarassed: )


But... I was turning at a relatively wide arc radius.  I think my arms were a bit locked up, and I was still holding the bars relatively straight, rather than letting it settle into the turn properly.

My HEAD told me, "uhh.. youd better turn it in now". But my emotions kept yelling at me "NONONONO something bad will happen!!"


So I guess I have two related questions.

1. Normally, I know that our GS500 really LIKES to have its front turn in to a corner, so much so that some people complain about it  :woohoo:

But have you racers noticed if there's a lean angle past which, it doesnt want to turn in by itself any more?


2. *will* "something bad happen" if I turn it in forcibly?
Will it try to do a leaned-over "stoppie" and do a forward flip or something?
Does it depend on whether i turn it in quickly vs slowly?
(okay that was 3-in-1 questions there. sorry :) )




comradeiggy:
Probably high side.

SAFE-T:
Max lean angle + turning forks to lock = crashing LOL

Lowside, not highside.

Mostly, you are putting two things together that are used at different speeds ~ low speed = turn handlebars in direction you want to go; higher speed = push steer in direction you want to go. What you are describing would be like leaning left but push steering to the right ~ at the very least the bike would feel really unstable. If your speed was under 20mph (30km/h) the gyroscopic procession of the wheels would be miminal, and you would tuck the front tire and low-side.   

Phil B:

--- Quote from: SAFE-T on May 13, 2012, 02:58:26 PM ---
Mostly, you are putting two things together that are used at different speeds ~ low speed = turn handlebars in direction you want to go; higher speed = push steer in direction you want to go.

--- End quote ---

Not entirely true for the second one.

At higher speeds, yes you push the side that you want to steer to, to set up the lean. But once the lean is established, you normally losen up your push, and let the front wheel settle where the bike wants to point it.
Which, due to the rake of the front wheel, is *into* the turn. 

In the "similar yet different" category: Some people keep pushing on the right side of the bars, throughout the whole time they are completing a right turn.  Most people do, particular since the gs500 "wants to turn in", so you want to counter that. But if you actually *look at the wheel angle* the next time you're doing a turn at speed, you should notice that after you establish the lean, it's still actually pointing in.

"exterting pressure in a leftwards direction", is not the same thing as "the wheels is actually pointing left all the time"

Well, you might not notice, actually. Most people only use a small turn angle at high speed, so it's tough to see.. but it *does* turn in. Otherwise you wouldnt actually turn.
Go look at slow-mo replays of professional races.

Or, take a look at this "in cockpit" video of a CBR1000, and look very carefully which way the bars are tilting on the high speed turns, when it's actually IN the turns.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2axvGaDCyY

SAFE-T:
Correct-a-mundo. Once the bike leans over, the wheel does turn a very slight amount in the direction you are going. But if then try to actually turn the handlebars in that direction you will be unhappy with the results.

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