Author Topic: Correct chain slack on centre stand  (Read 439 times)

Offline Kookas

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Correct chain slack on centre stand
« on: April 17, 2018, 05:42:44 PM »
What's the correct chain slack when measured on the centre stand?

I'm having a hard time finding any qualified numbers online.

I've currently got 1.5 inches at the loosest point, with variation of maybe .2 inches or so. With me sat on it that drops to about an inch, maybe a touch over.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 06:12:18 PM by Kookas »

Offline J_Walker

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2018, 07:11:56 PM »
when on the side stand I always touch it with my shoe, if its bettween 1"-2" slack range I'm okay with that...

in my opinion too tight is worse than too lose, both are bad, but too tight is gonna fail before too loose.. and too loose is just annoying to ride with noise wise.

you need like 5" of slack or so before your chain is in the danger zone. I've run the GS with 3" of slack on a good chain, off road, over hills. and it never popped off.  :cookoo:
-Walker

Offline qcbaker

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2018, 07:49:39 PM »
I thought chain slack was supposed to be adjusted with the bike on the side stand?

Offline gregjet

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2018, 08:12:40 PM »
If you have a longer shock ( the katana shock for instance) the chain MUST be slaker than stock . With no weight on the wheel the axle will be furthur down and the CS/ axle distance will be shorter stock.

Offline Kookas

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2018, 09:09:01 PM »
I thought chain slack was supposed to be adjusted with the bike on the side stand?

I don't believe it makes a huge difference as long as you account for the decreased weight. I just wonder how much I need to leave to account for that. To be honest though, after I checked the slack sitting on it I kind of feel like it's fine as is. Any tighter might risk it getting too tight.

Offline alpo

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2018, 11:31:55 PM »
Tight is much worse than loose. A tight chain causes all sorts of suspension and traction problems.

FWIW I set mine the other day on the side stand. I just checked it on the center stand and the slack is about the same.

Offline twocool

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2018, 12:52:21 AM »


read the owner's manual  or the maintenance manual.  Both give exact acceptable range of chain slack (20mm  to 30mm) and method of checking (on the side stand, NOT the center stand).  I personally go toward the "looser" end of the range...just seems to run smoother and quieter.


Cookie




What's the correct chain slack when measured on the centre stand?

I'm having a hard time finding any qualified numbers online.

I've currently got 1.5 inches at the loosest point, with variation of maybe .2 inches or so. With me sat on it that drops to about an inch, maybe a touch over.

Offline Joolstacho

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2018, 10:07:17 AM »
I thought chain slack was supposed to be adjusted with the bike on the side stand?
Think about it...
do you ride your bike on the centre stand?
Beam me up Scottie....

Offline Joolstacho

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2018, 10:11:50 AM »
I thought chain slack was supposed to be adjusted with the bike on the side stand?

Think about it...
Do you ride your bike on the centre stand? If you do, adjust it there (and good luck to you!).
But if you ride like the rest of us, with the stand up and your weight ON the bike, adjust the chain so there is adequate free play with your weight on the bike, because that's where it will be when you're riding.
Make sense?
Beam me up Scottie....

Offline Kookas

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2018, 11:22:07 AM »
I thought chain slack was supposed to be adjusted with the bike on the side stand?

Think about it...
Do you ride your bike on the centre stand? If you do, adjust it there (and good luck to you!).
But if you ride like the rest of us, with the stand up and your weight ON the bike, adjust the chain so there is adequate free play with your weight on the bike, because that's where it will be when you're riding.
Make sense?

It's a little hard to adjust the chain slack whilst sitting on the bike, though.

Offline twocool

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2018, 01:41:10 PM »
why not simply read and follow the manual?   It's easy, it works, no problems!

Or do you think the Suzuki engineers are stupid?


Cookie
« Last Edit: April 18, 2018, 11:41:32 PM by twocool »

Online mr72

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2018, 02:27:13 PM »
Or do you thing the Suzuki engineers are stupid?

Judging by the comments on this forum, it seems many here do think Suzuki engineers are stupid.

Offline J_Walker

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2018, 03:01:41 PM »
Or do you thing the Suzuki engineers are stupid?

Judging by the comments on this forum, it seems many here do think Suzuki engineers are stupid.

Know how many times I've taken apart a GS and been left with a floor of loose bolts and parts, I think they are stupid, putting a bunch of useless things on the GS..
-Walker

Offline qcbaker

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2018, 03:22:55 PM »
It's easy to blame "engineers" for stuff that makes your repair job harder than it needs to be, but the reality is that the engineers were working under constraints placed on them by the accountants, government regulations, etc. For example, the PAIR system on the CA-spec bikes is completely unnecessary and overcomplicates the bike. Left to their own devices, the engineers probably would never have designed something like that. However, their hand was forced in that situation. There's almost always an explanation for a "stupid" design choice other than "the engineers are stupid".

The GS shares many parts with previous and concurrent year bikes. This is almost assuredly a way to keep the price of production down. If the engineers were allowed to research, design, and test until they have the ideal part with a perfect balance of form, function, and serviceability, the bike then needs to be sold for an incredible amount of money. Who's going to buy a 500cc commuter bike that costs as much as a superbike? Literally nobody.

Offline Kookas

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2018, 05:38:10 PM »
why not simply read and follow the manual?   It's easy, it works, no problems!

Or do you thing the Suzuki engineers are stupid?


Cookie

No, but manuals are often driven by corporate politics and ass-covering. The manual isn't direct from engineers, it's passed through a bunch of legal teams and other such nonsense along the way.

For example: "Chain replacement requires swing arm removal...Never install a master link type chain." yeah... no. I'd rather get my information directly than read the manual on the off chance there is something in there that is genuine and not driven by a vested-interest driven desire to make a simple job look like something only an authorised Suzuki dealer is capable of by suggesting you disassemble the whole bike for it.

In any case, I decided the current slack will do me for now. A good sign as I haven't adjusted it in 4000 miles - hopefully that means the chain has many more miles yet.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2018, 05:46:32 PM by Kookas »

Offline alpo

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2018, 07:59:20 PM »
Some bikes do have the chain adjusted on the center stand. My FZ1, for example. Having the bike on the center stand makes aligning the rear wheel a lot easier.

A riveted chain is a lot stronger than one with a master link. On lower horsepower bikes a master link is fine, but high horsepower bikes need the extra strength. Of course it means buying more tools....  :D


Offline gregjet

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2018, 08:24:54 PM »
A PROPERLY riveted chain is as strong as a properly installed master link. The load is on the pins and plates and the clips take no load.  With modern tight fit master links, a rivetted link has no advantage.  A poorly rivetted link is weaker than a master link as the peen can break off or if installed skew will walk and tear the peen. The master link means you are more likely to service your chain properly because it is easier to get it off. Also allows you to check your sprockets better.
I always put a master link on when I break the chain to service it . I am very careful about the choice of master link though. In 46 years of riding and racing, on the street and dirt and  I have never had a chain fail at a masterlink. That actual riding I started at 19 and I am 65.
BTW an unmentioned bad effect of too tight a chain is sprocket carrier bearing wear/ breakage and same for countershaft sprocket bearing. I have seen a completely collapsed CS bearing AND cracked cases from a too tight chain on a VTR250. Engine was a writeoff.

Offline alpo

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2018, 11:04:47 PM »
Meh.

Do as you please. They put riveted chains on for a reason. The clip on master links has been known to fail under load. Chains stretch. Properly riveted links are much stronger. A chain breaking/riveting tool is a minor investment.

Offline gregjet

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2018, 06:26:52 AM »
They put riveted chains on at the factory because it takes less than 10 secs with the air tool to put a riveted link on by machine ( hand tool) and over a minute for a master link. It's a money saving process.
Master link ( properly fitted) is the SAME strength as a riveted link under load.
Chains do not stretch, the enlongation is caused by the increase in tolerence between the pins, rollers , plates and sprockets by virtue of wear. That's why lubing a chain is important and why sealed chains last longer.
And yes a chainbreaking/riveting tool is a good investment.

Offline sledge

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Re: Correct chain slack on centre stand
« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2018, 11:45:13 AM »
On dear dear dear!

I see this....'Its never happened to me so it won't happen to you'.....attitude still prevails. It's very patronising if you don't mind me saying.

Fact is split links DO fail, bike forums are full of the stories and experiences and many years ago when this forum had a gallery there were several pics of failed links posted by actual GS5 owners along with the back stories.

I appreciate failures are rare and not everyone will see one. Me? I have only had one fail, it was over 200 miles from home on a rainy sunday evening. Very expensive, very inconvenient and after that experience I never went near one again.

My logic is this, if you use one it could fail, if you don't use one there is nothing there to fail

Does that make sense?........probably not to some in here  :dunno_black:

Your bike, your choice. Play it how you want  :D