Author Topic: Triumph Talk  (Read 188 times)

Offline mr72

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Triumph Talk
« on: October 18, 2018, 02:08:35 PM »
Since it's been raining and I can't ride, I've been kind of tinkering with my new-to-me 2012 Bonneville.

First, a giant PITA came from my obligatory bar swap. The bike came with Napoleon bar end mirrors which fix to the bars usng an axial bolt that threads into a sort of nut that's welded into the end of the bar about 3/4" from the end. I would really like to use these mirrors with the Superbike bars that are on it now, but these aftermarket bars don't have the nuts in there for these mirrors, obviously. First effort was to epoxy a T-nut into the bar, which didn't hold. Then I thought maybe JB Weld would be better, and it was, but not good enough. Now I'm back to the drawing board. The Triumphrat forum members recommended sort of a DIY version of a rubber expansion plug, which looks like it'd work but t's not exactly something that's easy to implement. So for now, these cool mirrors are sitting on the bench while I scratch my head and use a random sport-bike style replacement mirror that happened to be in my junk box that totally doesn't look the part. Probably going to wind up biting the bullet and buying some non-authentic bar end mirrors that clamp around the end of the bar or with their own proprietary plug, which is a drag because these Napoleon mirrors are legit.

The original exhaust on the Bonnie is so quiet you can barely hear it running, and one muffler is scraped from a fall. So I ordered a 2-1 system with removable baffle. This should make the bike a lot louder and also likely drop 20-30 lb or more. Doing just this mod prompts re-tuning much like you'd do with big exhaust on a GS, but in the case of the EFI Triumphs you re-tune with the OBD2 connector and flash a new map. The tool of choice is a program called Tune ECU that runs on Android phones and tablets and allows dowload, upload, edit, etc. of these map files. This controls not only fuel mapping but also ignition timing. It's pretty rad, actually. So doing the exhaust mod plus a handful of "free" mods to the airbox combined with the right ECU mapping should result in about +16 hp at the wheel on my Bonneville. That's going from just over 50 hp at the wheel to >66, a 30% increase in power. Dude, talk about leaving hp on the table.

[side bar: Triumph themselves did remap the ECU for 2014+ bikes that gives an extra ~4-5 hp, so part of this gain I expect to get would be available if I just remapped my bone stock Bonnie with the 2014+ map]

Anyway, I ordered the exhaust system yesterday and they shipped it same day from CA. Should be here early next week.

I found that I liked my shorty levers so much on my GS that I ordered an identical set for the Triumph, which unfortunately are coming from Hong Kong, and will take another 2 weeks to get here. And when I say they are identical, I think they are actually identical, as in, Triumph and Suzuki use the same levers. Interesting, eh?

I also find one thing interesting about how the Triumph guys think about suspension mods vs. our group here. Everyone wants to "improve" the Triumph suspension, which in the context of Bonnie riders means make it softer. The feeling of the collective is the suspension is too firm, especially the rear. Here on GSTwins we all think the factory suspension is too soft, and we "improve" it by making it firmer. On the Triumph, the idea is to use progressive springs, which I am guessing is largely due to limited travel. You need progressive springs so you can make it softer on bump performance without making it bottom all the time. But the GSers prefer linear springs. Anyway, with the 0.90kg/mm front springs and Katana rear shock my GS suspension is still softer than the stock Bonneville. I actually think this is a part of the Bonnie's character. I also think this is why my GS is so tall compared to the Bonnie. Anyway, I have a new (well, used, but new to me) set of rear shocks to go on the Bonnie, not because I think it's too harsh, but because they are 1.5" longer and I want to raise the seat height. The fact that they are like 2-3 lb lighter per shock and have far better dampers is gravy.

The really big challenge for me right now is storage. I really want to be able to use the Bonnie for everything I used the GS for: commuting, grocery store trips, backroads pleasure rides, big road trips, etc. On the GS I have a scooter-type top box that makes it very useful for every kind of trip, and I can remove the box if I really want to in order to streamline the bike, but I never do. The GS has this kind of utility-knife, streetfighter look and the box doesn't really detract. OTOH the Triumph has gorgeous lines and a top box or even a rack on the back would look completely out of place. Rigid "soft" panniers (aka "saddlebags") are probably the right solution, with an elaborate quick release system I'd have to design and build myself, but these things are gloriously expensive. Triumph makes a set of "waxed cotton and leather" saddle bags that would be perfect but they are, <ahem> <b><i>seven hundred freaking dollars!!</b></i> OMG, and they don't even include a motorcycle for that price. I have a bag that's affectionately known as a "Jack Pack", which is a vintage-military-style messenger bag made popular years ago when Jack Bauer carried one like it on an episode or two of 24. I am considering riveting in some ABS sheet to the interior of this bag to make it become rigid and then lining it with adhesive felt and add some aluminum reinforcement where necessary so it'll hold its shape even when packed. I just need something that'll hold two standard bags of groceries, my laptop, or my jacket. Is that too much to ask? Apparently. Oh, and I am not interested in the bulk market of "synthetic leather" saddlebags, those are virtually all styled to work only on choppers or Harleys. I am open to suggestions though.

Now if it'll ever stop raining I'll go ride a bit. I did take the Triumph out to get it inspected yesterday, and it was 48F out with a very fine drizzle. Seemed like the perfect British weather to go ride a British motorbike. There is something really special about a motorcycle that starts cold and runs absolutely perfectly 5 seconds after it's been started. After sitting for a week my GS really doesn't like to run unless you put it on PRI and we all know how long it takes to get these bikes warmed up. But this big wide 865cc twin definitely puts its heat closer to your legs than the GS's compact 487cc unit does, let me tell you. Works great when it's cold out, that heat comes off the fins and right onto your legs. I think this may wind up being pretty miserable in the TX summer.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2018, 02:17:37 PM by mr72 »

Offline qcbaker

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2018, 02:16:42 PM »
Let the eurosnob flow through you.


Offline mr72

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2018, 02:25:55 PM »
Oh yes. Another reason I didn't buy a Ducati Scrambler. To think, I could have been simultaneously looked down upon by other Ducati owners and be thought of as a snob by my friends here on GSTwins!

And I did consider for half a minute test-riding a Moto Guzzi but I kind of decided that leaking oil and months-long parts wait times were not quirks of a new bike that I wanted to learn to embrace. I mean, I already have a motorcycle that leaks oil.

The Triumph Bonneville folks don't seem to be quite so snobby just yet. Maybe if I were to hang with the S3 set it would be different. But they do have "lifestyle apparel" :)  Just like the video. And a Triumph key tag is only like $30. Plus shipping, I guess. From England. If I combine that with the $700 saddle bags I can save a coupla quid on shipping, right?


Offline qcbaker

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2018, 02:34:01 PM »
And a Triumph key tag is only like $30. Plus shipping, I guess. From England. If I combine that with the $700 saddle bags I can save a coupla quid on shipping, right?

Only an idiot would pass up a deal like that! Lol.

But in all seriousness, the Bonnie seems like a very cool bike that checks all your boxes, so I'm happy for you that you finally have a bike that (hopefully) you'll spend more time riding on than wrenching on. As for the bar end mirrors, couldn't you just buy a set that attach via an expanding insert? That's how my weighted bar ends attach, and I could've sworn I saw plenty of bar-end mirrors that attached the same way.

EDIT: CycleGear stocks these: https://www.cyclegear.com/gear/oxford-bar-end-mirrors-2018 which seem like they would work pretty well.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2018, 02:39:48 PM by qcbaker »

Offline mr72

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2018, 03:36:20 PM »
Only an idiot would pass up a deal like that! Lol.

I think I qualify then!

Quote
But in all seriousness, the Bonnie seems like a very cool bike that checks all your boxes, so I'm happy for you that you finally have a bike that (hopefully) you'll spend more time riding on than wrenching on.

In all honesty, I did spend much more time riding my GS than I did working on it. I mean, in two years I rode over 5K miles on it, which is pretty good. It's just that it happened to break in unexpected ways right when I needed it to work, and every time I had to repair anything it seemed to be good money after bad.

Quote
As for the bar end mirrors, couldn't you just buy a set that attach via an expanding insert?

Yeah, that's exactly what I did. Problem is that I really want to use the existing mirrors, and they are not compatible with most other bar end mirror inserts. I have a set on the way that appears to have a rubber expansion plug type insert that I may be able to rob from those mirrors and use with the Napoleons, or otherwise I can just use the new mirrors which are less cool by half, but at least they will be functional.

Offline Watcher

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2018, 04:51:54 AM »
Problem is that I really want to use the existing mirrors, and they are not compatible with most other bar end mirror inserts. I have a set on the way that appears to have a rubber expansion plug type insert that I may be able to rob from those mirrors and use with the Napoleons, or otherwise I can just use the new mirrors which are less cool by half, but at least they will be functional.


If you have a local CycleGear they will have bar-ends with either the rubber type of expanding plug or a system of two metal bushings cut at an angle such that when they are drawn together they push each other "out".  Something like the latter should be easily adapted to work with at most a change of bolt/nut to the proper size that the mirrors already use.
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Offline mr72

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2018, 01:01:27 PM »
Thanks, Watcher. I considered doing just that but looking at the CG website it didn't look like the bar end plugs they had were going to be specifically adaptable to my bar end mirrors, but I could have been wrong. I didn't actually go in person. Instead I ordered a pair of cheap bar end mirrors with the attachment method that looked like it could be adapted to my mirrors, and figured if I couldn't make the ends adapt, at least I could use the mirrors. Turns out the ends worked fine, all I needed was that piece of thick rubber tubing. So the mirrors are mounted!

Now I'm on to the next project. I made a rigid insert from ABS and aluminum that crams snugly into my "Jack Pack", so now I have a free-floating rigid pannier that I need to figure out how to mount. I will probably tinker around with that today using an array of bits from the folding luggage cart that I robbed parts from to make my top case rack for the GS. I think it's likely that eventually I'll wind up with a set of proper side bags either rigid saddlebags or whatever, but it may take me months to find just the right ones and for example I'm about to go get donuts on the Bonnie this morning and those are going to be hard to fit in my jacket pocket.

The exhaust system is scheduled to arrive Wednesday. I already have the plugs for the SAI-removal and my friend 3D printed me an airbox cover (sort of an air horn/flow-smoother-outer). Figure later this week I'll be doing the exhaust and airbox mods, remove the SAI, and re-flash the ECU. But in the meantime today's the only day with less than a 40% chance of rain for the last 10 weeks in CenTX so I'm gonna ride while the sun's shining.

Offline mr72

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2018, 06:25:54 PM »
So I have done a number of mods and the 2:1 exhaust system came in today. The goal of that swap, among other things, was weight reduction.

Users of the triumphrat forum suggest that such a swap can yield anywhere from 36 to 45 lb. Yeah, um. No.

The exhaust system that came off the bike, both mufflers and both headers, all together weighs....

25 lb.

The new system weighs 18.4 lb. I guess every little bit helps, but this is truly a little bit.

I did also remove probably a quarter pound worth of O2 sensors and probably a whole pound in the air injection system. So let's just round up everything and say this whole project, including the handlebar swap etc., is going to make the bike a whole 10 lb lighter.

BTW I rode the GS for an errand today since the Bonnie is in pieces. Suffice to say, I still love it. It's tall and top heavy by comparison, runs crummy when cold, but has a sweeter exhaust note and likes it when you rev it. But I still love it. Gonna be real hard if I wind up selling it.

Offline mr72

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2018, 11:42:30 AM »
After getting the exhaust installed yesterday (which was real easy)  I discovered that with the new exhaust, the pipe tilts upwards much more than the stock exhaust did, such that it comes painfully close to my recently-custom-made waxed-cotton pannier. The outlet is about 2-3" away from the bottom of the bag which kind of worries me since parrafin-infused cotton sounds a whole lot like a candle wick and I seem to recall those are a bit flammable. I don't think the heat of the exhaust would ever be nearly enough to cause ignition but I do think it might be enough to cause the wax to soften and drip from the bag onto the pipe itself. Still the tail pipe is probably not hot enough to ignite wax. Guess I won't know till I try.

I went on my first long ride on the Bonnie yesterday with all of the mods in place except for the remapping of the ECU, which has to wait on a cable coming from England. On my GS, one of my biggest complaints was that after about a half hour of riding my right foot gets numb and after an hour it's not just numb but kind of painfully numb. I wind up having to take it off the peg and shake it out all the time just to keep going. Good news is after a 2+ hour ride on the Bonnie, no numbness at all in my foot. Also my left hand was always sore on the GS but not so on the Bonnie. Who knows why. I think the truth is the much longer seat-to-peg distance is a game changer for me. The GS was just always too cramped for someone my size. Remember all those times I asked about how to lower the pegs? I needed them like 3-4" lower, and that's just not going to happen.

Another thing I noticed on the long ride is that while the Bonnie definitely puts a smile on your face on the rare occasion you can open it up and ring it out, it is not as engaging to ride as the GS. You don't have to work the gears really much at all. I did a lot of 45-50mph winding hill country roads never shifting out of 4th gear. It has plenty of torque at 2500 rpm and up so going from 30-50  mph in 4th gear is just easy. Of course the bike will go over 50mph in first gear before it hits the rev limiter and I think after I remap it and change the rev limit to 8500 rpm it may make a 0-60 run in first gear and probably in under 4 seconds, but who rides that way? Hooligans, I guess. But not me. I've ridden this same route and roads many times on the GS and it's a left-foot festival. Every time slowing into a corner it's downshift to 2nd or 3rd, then out of the corner shifting back up to 4th or 5th to get comfortable for a section of 45mph flat-straight road. So that's using gears 2-5 basically all the time on these hill country roads on the GS where the Bonnie does it all in 4th alone.

The other thing that makes the GS more engaging is weight and center of gravity. I'm over 200 lb so on a 370-lb motorcycle, 35% of the total bike+rider weight is above the seat. This gives a pretty top-heavy feel. OTOH my Bonneville is probably at least 470 lb and has a lower seat to boot. And all of that extra 100 lb is about 9 inches off the ground. This really gives a light feel leaning it, kind of like a "Weeble". It never feels like it is going to tip and you don't have to really put much body control into the lean, not like you do on the GS. It just feels like it will lean further without getting unstable and grips like mad, I'm sure it's because of the more weight on the tires. As a sports car guy, this is very counter-intuitive to me, but the physics works.

The other thing on the GS that adds tremendously to the engagement in riding it is the soundtrack. The exhaust note is much better than the Bonneville. It has this thumper-like "bop-bop-bop" idle that turns into a howly song as you rev it past 5K that really is a beautiful sound. On decel it crackles and talks back. It's lovely. It invites you to repeatedly rev it and let it decelerate in gear just to hear that glorious noise. Now, I am still running the baffle in the Bonneville exhaust until I can remap it so I am not yet sure what the full glory of its sound is going to be, but it really is more of a "putt-putt-putt" at idle that turns into "pft-pft-pft" as you rev it with none of these overtones that you get in the 180-degree GS. It's like a 4-year-old making airplane noises with his lips. The Thruxton I rode with obnoxious "Dominator" open pipes made an ugly "BLAAAT!" when you revved it. I don't have high hopes for the tonal potential of the Triumph.

Anyway, all of this together adds up to the GS being a much more interactive, engaging bike to ride. You HAVE to work it around corners, you HAVE to control your body and weight shift. You absolutely must get it in the right gear; you can't just wind up coming out of a turn at 2000 rpm and expect to accelerate out of the exit without downshifting. In all of this, it demands more of the rider and rewards you for getting it right. The Bonneville is just kind of the opposite. You can go into a turn too fast and trail-brake hard while just leaning way more and it just turns without any complaint. You can hit a 20-mph-marked curve in 4th gear and wind up at 1500 rpm on the exit and just open the throttle and it'll get you back up to 50mph in about two seconds without even making any noise. It's incredibly forgiving. It's just a whole different kind of ride.

One other thing I noticed basically immediately when I got back on the GS after a week of riding the Bonnie all the time was how much softer the GS's ride is. After doing our hill country route yesterday, which has a bunch of poorly-maintained backroads with plenty of bumps and chattery pavement, the serious stiffness of the Bonneville really showed and I honestly wished I was on the GS on those sections. I do have a new set of rear shocks waiting for the right bushings to come in the mail so I can put them on the Bonneville and someone posted the matching progressive fork springs on CL for $50 and I think I'm going to jump on that. Again I say, GS owners tend to improve the suspension my making it more firm, and Bonnevile owners do the opposite. I can see why. That Bonnie is a rough-riding bike.

This all is complicating my decision-making process about whether to sell the GS. I think the numb-foot thing may be thing that puts it over the edge. As good as it is, the GS just doesn't fit me, never did, and never will.

Offline Watcher

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2018, 06:33:16 PM »
Another thing I noticed on the long ride is that while the Bonnie definitely puts a smile on your face on the rare occasion you can open it up and ring it out, it is not as engaging to ride as the GS. You don't have to work the gears really much at all...
I've ridden this same route and roads many times on the GS and it's a left-foot festival. Every time slowing into a corner it's downshift to 2nd or 3rd, then out of the corner shifting back up to 4th or 5th to get comfortable for a section of 45mph flat-straight road. So that's using gears 2-5 basically all the time on these hill country roads on the GS where the Bonnie does it all in 4th alone...

Anyway, all of this together adds up to the GS being a much more interactive, engaging bike to ride. You HAVE to work it around corners, you HAVE to control your body and weight shift. You absolutely must get it in the right gear; you can't just wind up coming out of a turn at 2000 rpm and expect to accelerate out of the exit without downshifting. In all of this, it demands more of the rider and rewards you for getting it right. The Bonneville is just kind of the opposite...

This all is complicating my decision-making process about whether to sell the GS.

Same feeling I got from the Buell.  It was a great bike and was fun in it's own way, but compared to a smaller bike that makes you work to be fast it's, for lack of a better term, boring in the twisties.

I think that if I had kept my CB500F and gotten the Buell I might still have both right now.  As an only bike the Buell had some commuter negatives and wasn't as challenging on the mountain, the Honda was a much better all-around bike despite it's lack of speed, and was more fun to ride fast despite it's, well, lack of speed.

I vote keep both.  At the very least the GS might be a good fun-run bike and at most a good backup for when you realize half way through the Bonnie oil change you don't have a new crush-washer.
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Offline mr72

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2018, 06:49:45 PM »
Watcher, I figured you'd have some experience that would illuminate my recent findings. I just haven't spent any real time riding any street bike except my GS, and now, the new Bonneville.

Quote
I vote keep both.  At the very least the GS might be a good fun-run bike and at most a good backup for when you realize half way through the Bonnie oil change you don't have a new crush-washer.

Yeah, I am pretty sure I'll keep both, just for the reasons you describe. It's a good backup, and actually the GS might be a better long-trip tourer. Plus I can keep the topcase on it and it becomes a terrific errand-runner. And given the fact that some parts are going to have to come from England (even for a bike made in Thailand!), I might really appreciate having a dependable backup, not to mention times when I am riding places where I will run a higher risk of scratches, dents, or theft, where I might prefer to ride the GS.

I also think it might be a great cure for boredom.  :D

We shall see. I like having them both now. :)

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2018, 05:59:44 PM »
Finished mounting my saddle bag over the weekend.



I got spoiled with the top case on the GS, which enabled me to use the bike for just about any errand. But a top case and even a rack that would support it would ruin the look of the Triumph, so I decided a single saddle bag was the right choice. I have quite a collection of messenger bags around here, and I started by using this military-style bag that is commonly known as a "Jack Pack", due to Jack Bauer carrying one in a few 24 episodes. I built an aluminum and ABS rigid liner for it and made some custom mounts for the bike to hold it. Then I added some parachute style latches and straps to hold the flap down since the velcro was not getting the job done. Oh yeah, and I treated this bag with wax to make it sort of water resistant. Anyway, it pretty much works to enable me to get very small things, will hold my laptop, or return a DVD to redbox, etc. But it's going to prove basically useless for the near-daily grocery trips I did on the GS. I need something bigger long term. And this bag is too close to the rear passenger peg. I really need a different solution. I'll roll with this for a while and then reassess this need in a few months. Meantime, it gives me a good reason to take the GS.

Offline mr72

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2018, 12:28:19 PM »
My new shorty brake and clutch levers arrived for the Triumph yesterday, I put them on and went on an hour-plus test ride. These are basically identical to the ones on my GS, which is a good thing. Man, I love being able to adjust the lever reach. That's the best $17 I could possibly spend on upgrades. Speaking of spending $17, I am still waiting on a cable to reflash the ECU, which had to be shipped from England. Freakin' British bike. It's not the bike's fault, but just that the software that's used to flash the ECU is only compatible with one specific cable, and as it turns out the only outfit selling that cable is in the UK. It's probably no coincidence that a large number of the users of said software are Triumph owners. So I can't pull the "baffle" (aka "dB killer") out of the exhaust until I can get this cable and reflash the ECU for fear of running the bike too lean. This is how you "rejet" an EFI motorcycle in the modern world. While the reflash and pipes upgrade should make for an additional 10-15 hp and raise the rev limit by 500 rpm, what I'm really hoping for is less of a lawn-mower type exhaust note. The GS really blows away the Triumph in terms of soundtrack.

Funny thing that I wound up quite unintentionally ruffling some feathers in the Triumph forum, which reminded me of what a gem this forum is. I think there's something to be said for a forum dedicated to inexpensive, unassuming motorcycles. You wind up with unpretentious and laid-back owners.  :thumb:

Oh, and the exhaust did melt my saddle bag. Ho-hum. Now I have to get another one, mount it on the left. Gotta tinker with something, right?

Offline mr72

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2018, 04:37:21 PM »
My magic cable finally came from England, and I bit the bullet and paid for the $130 known-to-work "tune" to reflash the Bonneville's ECU. That was a process made more challenging because 1) the program only runs on Windows, and I have Macs, 2) the specific program I paid for will not run on a VM, won't even try, which is dumb, and 3) there's a "reset adaptation" function where the ECU re-learns where the "0" position of the TPS is, which requires you to start the bike and let it run until the oil temp reaches 70 C and the ECU then learns the TPS position, and since my bike's neutral switch is dodgy that meant I had to stand there with it idling holding it up for 20 minutes for this process to complete since putting the side stand down would kill the engine.

Anyway, that's done. Haven't ridden because it's wet and rainy today. If the rain clears, I'll give it a shot later.

In GS news, well my job situation changed such that keeping the GS is a no-brainer. So now I need to determine a schedule where I will ride it routinely enough to keep the gas from going bad in the carbs. First world problems.

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2018, 08:15:52 PM »
With the ECU tuning and loud exhaust the Triumph is Really Fast. With the short-travel and very firm suspension it's also kind of punishing on some of these horrible CenTX county roads. I basically have created in my head a list of scenarios where the GS is a better choice, or really a better bike, mostly owing to softer suspension and a far more comfortable ride. Plus the GS has better electrical/charging system performance and a longer fuel range. The GS is more of a dependable do-all road bike, I'm finding, while the Bonnie is just more enjoyable as long as you stay within its limits. I think if I were setting out on a long trip to some place I have never been with lots of backroads and unknowns and potential weather ahead, I'd pick the GS nine times out of ten. It's kind of like owning a Honda Civic and a Jaguar XF. Sure, you wanna drive the Jag all the time but the Civic is probably a better all-around car.

I do think I'll wind up with a smaller sprocket on front on the GS to give back a little of what it loses to the Triumph on quickness, especially given that the Triumph will be my pick any time long stretches of 50+ mph are on the agenda. Plus I think it needs a little bit of that to make me want to pick it more often. In a month I've put 500 miles on the Triumph. I'm going to have to spread that kind of usage around!

But this does bring up an interesting point. I put 5K miles on the GS in two years, but I was using it more lately than I did the first year. Guessing maybe 2K the first year and 3K+ the second. I'm on pace to put 6K on the Triumph per year. There's something to be said for how much I enjoy the Triumph if it really does get used twice as much. I guess I am going to have to put my Jeep on the battery tender.

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2018, 07:11:23 AM »
Glad to hear you're enjoying it.   :woohoo:


I'm kinda-sorta re-thinking selling the Ducati.  Haven't had many bites in the months since listing it, none serious, and the other day it stranded me in a drive-thru.  I didn't idle it while waiting in the line of cars, but I also left the key on, and in that 3-minute stretch it lost enough juice to not even turn the starter.
The only options for a replacement battery were a conventional lead-acid type battery with an overflow drain (like what's in it) or a Shorai Lithium-Iron battery.  I'm tired of screwing around with wet-cells and the risk of them spilling, so I went lithium, and it wasn't cheap, even at employee pricing.
If the main objective is still to sell it I should have just gotten the cheapo acid battery, but...

Truth be told I still like the Ducati, a lot.  To date it's still the bike I've owned the longest, and while I've enjoyed other bikes more in some ways it seems none were as well rounded as the Monster, and the uniqueness and prestige it has is still attractive.
I may not take the listing down, but I am going to price it a little higher now that I have a Shorai in it.  If I get the right offer I may still sell it, but as of right now if that never happens I'm perfectly content to keep it.
"The point of a journey is not to arrive..."

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Re: Triumph Talk
« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2018, 01:58:18 PM »
Hey Watcher, I'd buy your Ducati :) At least I know it's extremely well cared-for. But I'll likely just get on the hunt for a M695 since that's the one I really want. Who knows, maybe I'll go ride one and decide I don't like it.

That's unfortunate news about the battery choices. Did you get a LiFePO4? I guess in AZ you probably won't experience the cold-weather issues I did. I might consider a LiFePO4 for my Triumph but I'd get one that's just as big as the one in the bike mostly to try to get more capacity out of the stock size battery because the Triumph is iffy starting every time. I'd probably swap the reg/rect for the same one I put in the GS at the same time, and eliminate extra connectors just as I did with the GS. Seems to be the ticket for fixing the bad starting. At least the Triumph is really easy to bump start.

My vote is to keep the Ducati since it seems to make you happy and get the charging system worked out. I can understand the reluctance to rely on a 15 year old Italian motorcycle as your primary vehicle, though. What would you replace it with anyway? I can't remember seeing that.